PRINCESS ANN HILLS

Late Fall 2017 Bulletin


The PAHCL Board held its 3rd quarterly meeting on November 15th.


Drainage Committee Update:  On Monday 11/6/17,  Michelle Laborde spoke with our contact at Virginia Beach City Waterways Department and reminded him that the goal of the Drainage Committee is not to prevent flooding on Goodspeed Rd., but to improve drainage after flooding events to be comparable to that of bordering streets, Discovery and 58th St. 


With this reminder, he offered the installation of stadia measurement tools at strategic points on the street and water sides of Goodspeed Rd. These measurements will officially determine if the water level in Raineys Gut and Crystal Lake is lower than that of Goodspeed Rd., when water is still impassable on Goodspeed, but has drained from Discovery and 58th St. This scenario would clearly indicate a drainage issue, and would therefore be handled in a different (more favorable) manner by the City.


The Operations department has since been in contact with Michelle to acknowledge receipt of the work order for the installation of the stadia tools, and indicated that it will contact her once a work date has been established. Certain Goodspeed Rd. residents will be contacted by Michelle to gain permission for the City to access their property to install the stadia on the water side of their properties. Your cooperation will be greatly appreciated. 


In order to prevent interruption of progress made with the City on the issue of Goodspeed Rd. drainage, the Drainage Committee respectfully requests that individual residents not contact the City concerning flooding or drainage during this delicate period of review, but rather to please direct concerns to the committee. Contact: Michelle Laborde at mlvbva@gmail.com



Improvements: Department of Public Works- has refilled the potholes at 59th and Holly Rd. S turn.

Landscaping/Public Works Dept.- Removal of debris along some of the curbs in the neighborhood: This has not been as easy to get the City’s help to clean up, and according to a representative, it is considered the responsibility of the home owners to maintain the curbs along their properties. However, some assistance would be nice, and we continue to ask both Landscaping or Public Works to sweep the streets. This natural erosion, where leaf and soil debris has encroached onto the street potentially poses a hazard. Drivers in their vehicles coming around curves, in particular, are having to extend across both lanes to avoid it.


It has been requested by neighbors to share two friendly reminders:


The canals are No Wake Zones- Residents have shared concerns of an increase in the number of boats going too fast, creating wakes in Rainey’s Gut, Stratton Creek, and the canals behind homes in the neighborhood. No Wake applies to jet skis and small water craft as well.

Barking Dogs- Dogs bark for a number of reasons, and occasional barking is not an issue. However, please be mindful that a dog that barks for extended periods of time, day or evening, can create a stressful environment for surrounding neighbors.

Events of Interest: The Miles Agency, in conjunction with Old Dominion University and the Dewberry Consultant Team, are working with the City of Virginia Beach in efforts to address the questions/concerns regarding the critical issue of sea level rise, recurrent flooding, and its impact on our community, economy, and military readiness. Public interactive workshops will be held on the following dates at these designated locations if you have interest in attending.


Public Interactive Sea Level Rise/Recurrent Flooding Workshop

Presenters ODU & Dewberry Confirmed locations:

12/4/17      6 - 8 p.m.   Kempsville High School

12/6/17      6 - 8 p.m.   Cox High School

12/11/17    6 - 8 p.m.   Cooke Elementary

1/17/18      6 - 8 p.m.   Landstown High School

1/22/18      6 - 8 p.m.   Kellam High School

1/25/18      6 - 8 p.m.   Princess Anne High School

1/29/18      6 - 8 p.m.   Bayside High School


Halloween: Thank you Ramos family for hosting another great party for the neighborhood. There were a few other gatherings as well, and it was great to see so many trick-or-treaters!


Princess Anne Garden Club- has delivered invites for all neighbors to attend the Annual Holiday Party. They’re changing it up with a new venue and a new time this year. Please join them for this special evening:


~Come Celebrate the Season~

Wednesday, December 6th

6:30 - 9:00 pm

Princess Anne Country Club

Prince Charles Room



Your check for $35 per person is your reservation. Please make payable to PAHGC, and deliver to Lori Dabul, Treasurer- 472 Goodspeed Rd., no later than

Friday, December 1, 2017.



Menu

Mini Beef Wellington

Fried Oysters

Pimento Cheese Arancini

Poached Pear Salad Skewers

Hot Crab Dip

Chicken Skewers with Sauces

Crudities

Miniature Desserts

PACC member signed or Cash Bar service

Address: 3800 Pacific Avenue

Attire: Holiday Festive ~ Adult residents only



2018 PAH Civic League Dues:  Please make checks payable to PAHCL and send your dues of $30 to Treasurer, Molly Ford- 424 Susan Constant Dr. 

Welcome Packets are ready and will be delivered to new neighbors this month. Thank you Camilla Savin for putting these beautiful books together for the neighborhood.  All of the pertinent and helpful information she has compiled into this packet will be accessible to everyone on the PA Hills website.

The PAHCL Annual Meeting and Social Hour will be

February 11, 2018 - 3:15-5:00 pm

A.R.E. 67th St.

Happy Thanksgiving, enjoy the Holiday Season!


Attached is an article of interest regarding the recent King Tide which we experienced the weekend of November 5, 2017:

’King Tide' mapping project

Date:

September 18, 2017

Source:

Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Summary:

'Dress rehearsal' will help quantify local flooding risk and validate storm-surge models, while laying groundwork for a long-term network of volunteer data collectors.

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FULL STORY


On the morning of November 5th, the highest astronomical tide of the year -- the so-called King Tide -- will swamp low-lying areas throughout Hampton Roads, with water peaking at 2 feet above mean sea level. By 2050, that is likely to be the new normal.


"King tides are increasingly viewed as harbingers of things to come as sea levels rise," says Dr. Derek Loftis, an assistant research scientist at William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science. "Where the tide reaches on November 5th is where you can expect the water to be just about every day at mid-century."


Now, Loftis has teamed with environmental reporter David Mayfield of The Virginian-Pilot, which along with WHRO Public Media, the Daily Press, and WVEC-TV are sponsoring a "Catch the King" event that will encourage local citizens to measure the reach of this year's highest tide using a purpose-built smart-phone app.


The freely available SeaLevelRise app was created by the non-profit Wetlands Watch and software developer Concursive, both based in Norfolk. It allows users to record GPS coordinates as they trace the landward reach of a flood event, whether due to a particularly high tide, a storm, or a combination of the two. The app then uploads these data points to an online map that anyone can see -- whether in the app or on the Sea Rising Solutions website.


Supporting the Catch the King event is the Commonwealth Center for Recurrent Flooding Resiliency, a partnership between VIMS, Old Dominion University, and the Virginia Coastal Policy Center at W&M Law School. Professor Mark Luckenbach, Associate Dean of Research and Advisory Services at VIMS, describes the CCRFR as a "'one-stop shop' for scientific, socio-economic, legal, and policy analyses aimed at building Virginia's resilience against flooding.”

The Center was established in 2016 by Virginia's General Assembly through the support of chief patron Delegate Chris Stolle.


"The Commonwealth's continued support enables Center researchers like myself to focus on flood-related issues that matter in Virginia," says Loftis. "The Commonwealth's investment in research allows me to address issues of national and even global scale, while applying solutions locally."

Those interested in participating in the Catch the King event can download the SeaLevelRise app for either iOS or Android beforehand; to contribute pictures or GPS data requires establishing a free account. High tides on October 7-8 will provide good opportunities for practice.


Modeling the Tide

Loftis describes the Catch the King event as "a low-stakes dress rehearsal that will help us better understand the risk of recurrent flooding in Hampton Roads, while laying the groundwork for a volunteer data-collection network for use during more substantial flood events."


In addition to helping local citizens visualize and recognize the threat of rising seas, the Catch the King event will provide critical data for improving the computer models that researchers at VIMS and elsewhere have developed to forecast the reach of coastal flooding.


"Participants will feed valuable data to scientists building predictive models for near-term events like storm surge and for long-term events like climate change," says Loftis.


Modelers like Loftis and VIMS professors Harry Wang and Joseph Zhang can compare the landward extent of this year's King Tide as mapped by the citizen-scientists with its extent as calculated in their simulations, using any discrepancies to improve model performance.


This process of "ground-truthing" a model with observed data is a long-standing and important part of model development, and has been used in fields as diverse as marine science, speech recognition, and finance.


"Tidal flooding, especially in urban settings and when compounded by wind and rain, is a complex modeling problem," says Loftis. "It can be better understood with more field data, whether that's collected by water-level sensors or citizen-scientists. We're really excited to see how much ground data we can collect during November's King Tide.”


Story Source:

Materials provided by Virginia Institute of Marine Science. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

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Virginia Institute of Marine Science. "'King Tide' mapping project." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 September 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/09/170918142147.htm>.